Atzko Kohashi

Press (EN)

Hanging delicately together by a shining silver thread, Aeon Trio’s music ebbs and flows from the speakers like rippling water…
Playing with a delicacy and subtlety rare in an age dominated by in your face, rapid fire rap lyrics and heavy metal’s dense riffage, Maya Fridman, Atzko Kohashi and Franz Van Der Hoeven have crafted pieces and reimagined classics for an unspecified Elegy.
‘Elegy’ though, is more of a description of the overall emotional quality of these pieces, rather than an exact definition.
Painful shades of resigned sadness, faded greys and off-whites, these are the colours of Elegy. Resignation not to the sadness, more so, a realisation that this is the way things are. Now and evermore.
Atzko’s quietly dissonant jazz chords add teasing hints of a deeper darkness to Maya’s mournful bowed cello lines on Lamento. While on Blues For Maya, Franz’s double bass lines give the piece the legs to soldier on. As musicians, this trio are not merely virtuosos. They are impeccable.
Like all the best players, Fridman, Kohashi and Van Der Hoeven understand the importance of breathing space. They each keep their own instrument’s parts suitably sparse as to give the others’ room to move. The end result is 13 pieces of perfectly complimentary yet contrasting instrument lines.
While the pace of the album is noticeably subdued, especially evident on the Trio’s version of Ornette Coleman’s Lonely Woman, to criticise Elegy for it’s consistently mellow pace would be to miss the point.
While the wild and frantic improv of the free jazz maestros is more immediately arresting, it’s also off-putting for many.
But Elegy, unlike the dismissal of free jazz by the ill-informed, could never be cast aside as mere “noise.”
As a result, rather than grabbing one by the lapels and shaking them for their attention, Aeon Trio have made a record that lure the listener in with beckoning finger. A tearful siren’s song.
An elegy without words. Yet, through the human qualities of these masters’ playing, images and, indeed, words, come cascading through the mind. Without such niceties as a powerful beat, catchy hooks or lyrics, Aeon Trio’s debut album is remarkably breathtaking in its scope.
…And the music flows on, the ripples slowly making their way to the shoreline. Let’s hope that someone, is paying attention.
by James Fleming
Hanging delicately together by a shining silver thread, Aeon Trio’s music ebbs and flows from the speakers like rippling water…
Playing with a delicacy and subtlety rare in an age dominated by in your face, rapid fire rap lyrics and heavy metal’s dense riffage, Maya Fridman, Atzko Kohashi and Franz Van Der Hoeven have crafted pieces and reimagined classics for an unspecified Elegy.
‘Elegy’ though, is more of a description of the overall emotional quality of these pieces, rather than an exact definition.
Painful shades of resigned sadness, faded greys and off-whites, these are the colours of Elegy. Resignation not to the sadness, more so, a realisation that this is the way things are. Now and evermore.
Atzko’s quietly dissonant jazz chords add teasing hints of a deeper darkness to Maya’s mournful bowed cello lines on Lamento. While on Blues For Maya, Franz’s double bass lines give the piece the legs to soldier on. As musicians, this trio are not merely virtuosos. They are impeccable.
Like all the best players, Fridman, Kohashi and Van Der Hoeven understand the importance of breathing space. They each keep their own instrument’s parts suitably sparse as to give the others’ room to move. The end result is 13 pieces of perfectly complimentary yet contrasting instrument lines.
While the pace of the album is noticeably subdued, especially evident on the Trio’s version of Ornette Coleman’s Lonely Woman, to criticise Elegy for it’s consistently mellow pace would be to miss the point.
While the wild and frantic improv of the free jazz maestros is more immediately arresting, it’s also off-putting for many.
But Elegy, unlike the dismissal of free jazz by the ill-informed, could never be cast aside as mere “noise.”
As a result, rather than grabbing one by the lapels and shaking them for their attention, Aeon Trio have made a record that lure the listener in with beckoning finger. A tearful siren’s song.
An elegy without words. Yet, through the human qualities of these masters’ playing, images and, indeed, words, come cascading through the mind. Without such niceties as a powerful beat, catchy hooks or lyrics, Aeon Trio’s debut album is remarkably breathtaking in its scope.
…And the music flows on, the ripples slowly making their way to the shoreline. Let’s hope that someone, is paying attention.
by James Fleming

Hanging delicately together by a shining silver thread, Aeon Trio’s music ebbs and flows from the speakers like rippling water…   Playing with a delicacy and subtlety rare in an age dominated by in your face, rapid fire rap lyrics and heavy metal’s dense riffage, Maya Fridman, Atzko Kohashi and Franz Van Der Hoeven have crafted pieces and reimagined classics for an unspecified Elegy.                                                          (by James Fleming)

‘Elegy’ though, is more of a description of the overall emotional quality of these pieces, rather than an exact definition.
Painful shades of resigned sadness, faded greys and off-whites, these are the colours of Elegy. Resignation not to the sadness, more so, a realisation that this is the way things are. Now and evermore.
Atzko’s quietly dissonant jazz chords add teasing hints of a deeper darkness to Maya’s mournful bowed cello lines on Lamento. While on Blues For Maya, Franz’s double bass lines give the piece the legs to soldier on. As musicians, this trio are not merely virtuosos. They are impeccable.
Like all the best players, Fridman, Kohashi and Van Der Hoeven understand the importance of breathing space. They each keep their own instrument’s parts suitably sparse as to give the others’ room to move. The end result is 13 pieces of perfectly complimentary yet contrasting instrument lines.
While the pace of the album is noticeably subdued, especially evident on the Trio’s version of Ornette Coleman’s Lonely Woman, to criticise Elegy for it’s consistently mellow pace would be to miss the point.
While the wild and frantic improv of the free jazz maestros is more immediately arresting, it’s also off-putting for many.
But Elegy, unlike the dismissal of free jazz by the ill-informed, could never be cast aside as mere “noise.”
As a result, rather than grabbing one by the lapels and shaking them for their attention, Aeon Trio have made a record that lure the listener in with beckoning finger. A tearful siren’s song.
An elegy without words. Yet, through the human qualities of these masters’ playing, images and, indeed, words, come cascading through the mind. Without such niceties as a powerful beat, catchy hooks or lyrics, Aeon Trio’s debut album is remarkably breathtaking in its scope.
…And the music flows on, the ripples slowly making their way to the shoreline. Let’s hope that someone, is paying attention.
by James Fleming
Playing with a delicacy and subtlety rare in an age dominated by in your face, rapid fire rap lyrics and heavy metal’s dense riffage, Maya Fridman, Atzko Kohashi and Franz Van Der Hoeven have crafted pieces and reimagined classics for an unspecified Elegy.
‘Elegy’ though, is more of a description of the overall emotional quality of these pieces, rather than an exact definition.
Painful shades of resigned sadness, faded greys and off-whites, these are the colours of Elegy. Resignation not to the sadness, more so, a realisation that this is the way things are. Now and evermore.
Atzko’s quietly dissonant jazz chords add teasing hints of a deeper darkness to Maya’s mournful bowed cello lines on Lamento. While on Blues For Maya, Franz’s double bass lines give the piece the legs to soldier on. As musicians, this trio are not merely virtuosos. They are impeccable.
Like all the best players, Fridman, Kohashi and Van Der Hoeven understand the importance of breathing space. They each keep their own instrument’s parts suitably sparse as to give the others’ room to move. The end result is 13 pieces of perfectly complimentary yet contrasting instrument lines.
While the pace of the album is noticeably subdued, especially evident on the Trio’s version of Ornette Coleman’s Lonely Woman, to criticise Elegy for it’s consistently mellow pace would be to miss the point.
While the wild and frantic improv of the free jazz maestros is more immediately arresting, it’s also off-putting for many.
But Elegy, unlike the dismissal of free jazz by the ill-informed, could never be cast aside as mere “noise.”
As a result, rather than grabbing one by the lapels and shaking them for their attention, Aeon Trio have made a record that lure the listener in with beckoning finger. A tearful siren’s song.
An elegy without words. Yet, through the human qualities of these masters’ playing, images and, indeed, words, come cascading through the mind. Without such niceties as a powerful beat, catchy hooks or lyrics, Aeon Trio’s debut album is remarkably breathtaking in its scope.
…And the music flows on, the ripples slowly making their way to the shoreline. Let’s hope that someone, is paying attention.
by James Fleming

“Pianist Atzko Kohashi is geboren in Japan en na omzwervingen in 2005 terecht gekomen in Amsterdam. Daar vormde ze een duo met bassist Frans van der Hoeven, waarvan in 2009 een cd verscheen. Met drummer Sebastiaan Kaptein is het duo uitgebreid tot trio. De cd Lujon is daarvan het eerste tastbare resultaat. De muziek van het trio is rustig en sfeervol; de klankkleur speelt een belangrijke rol. De meeste stukken zijn standards waarme vrij wordt omgesprongen. Zo wordt Footprints van Wayne Shorter in 5/4 maat gespeeld in plaats van 6/4. Daarnaast biedt het album drie collectieve improvisaties.                                                 (JAZZ BULLETIN, September 2015)

 

''Still waters run deep. A saying that certainly applies to pianist Atzko Kohashi which operates from the Netherlands since 2005. With great attention to sound, color and atmosphere models the Japanese ever again beautiful open spaces. Kohashi took 'Lujon' with a trio comprising bassist Frans van der Hoeven and drummer Sebastiaan Kaptein. With that first she is since her arrival in the Netherlands, a duo which they released several albums. Kaptein also with the pianist released a duo album out. Together they form a trio that regularly morning concerts since 2013 in the Beaufort in Austerlitz, resulting in it now appeared 'Lujon. "Lujon" coexists four trio compositions free arrangements of compositions by, among other Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, George Gershwin, Baden Powel, Charlie Chaplin ("Smile") and Henry Mancini (Lujon). Ranging repertoire that recognize a need to cozy trio pieces in which the musicians on par conduct a constant conversation. That partly improvised conversations have an open and often understated character and provide the group dynamics of a harmonious, almost zen-like atmosphere.  'Lyon' consists of melancholic mysterious and serene trio pieces performed by top musicians whose playing is thoughtful and self-aware. The dialogues between Kohashi, Van der Hoeven and Kaptein have a lasting fascinating content which depth, dynamics and creating room for error. "Lujon 'is thus a long life." (Jazzenzo.nl- 09 April 2015)

 

“Jazz-pianiste Atzko Kohashi heeft al eerder cd's uitgebracht met duetten met uitmuntende geluidskwaliteit, nu is er Lujon een cd met het klassieke piano trio. De schitterende opnames (One to One FDR mastering) vonden plaats in Hilversum en zijn uitgebracht door een Japanse platenmaatschappij (Cloud). Muzikaal is het een avontuurlijke reis in de jazz traditie met bass, drums en piano waar het oosten en het westen samenkomen. Lujon staat vol met mooie uitvoeringen van standards (o.a. Quiet van Danny Zeitlin, Gentle Piece van Kenny Wheeler) en improvisaties van de drie hoofdrolspelers. Luistertrip!”              (Concerto, 2015) 

 

"Japanese jazz pianist Atzko Kohashi has been living in Amsterdam since 2005. All these years to her immense satisfaction, as she writes in the liner notes to her latest album. The city inspires her; she has encountered many wonderful people, and she extols the rich jazz history of the Dutch capital, which boasts visits by many of the greatest names from the history of jazz. Clearly the album title 'Amstel Moments' is of great significance to this jazz pianist. With 'Amstel Moments', both Atzko Kohashi and bassist Frans van der Hoeven have recorded the first duo album of their career. And do they get off to a good start! Because the record is a wonderful sampling of their ability, combining abundant craftsmanship with a subtle sensibility for each other's emotions. All twelve tracks develop in a quiet, contemplative tempo. They never adorn their music with unnecessary edges or boastful display of virtuoso technique. Simply because this pianist and bassist don't need it: the way they play music reveals everything, both their personality and their musical ideas. Within the almost serene stillness that they create, they manage to add their own conceptions to the laws of jazz. For example, the tempo of the standard 'Don't Explain' is so slow that you wonder if the bass or the piano might stumble and fall. But far from it: the slowness adds an exciting distinction to the song. It is impressive how these two musicians communicate. Invariably their dialogue is harmonious: neither of them takes the lead, no one breaks out. Theirs is a continuous exchange of giving and accepting, elaborating and adding of own emotions and insights. That makes 'Amstel Moments' an exceptional recording and a delightful addition to the history of jazz city Amsterdam.”  (Jazzenzo.nl- 17 November 2009)

 

“Japanese jazz pianist Atzko Kohashi, who is self-taught but also took lessons from Steve Kuhn, is in love with Amsterdam. While she was successful in her home country and even spent seven years in the jazz Mecca New York, she waxes lyrical about the musical climate in Amsterdam in her interviews and the liner notes to her latest CD 'Amstel Moments'. Atzko enjoys the freedom and tolerance, the candor and down-to-earth mentality that permeate life in 'Mokum', the Dutch capital. Perhaps that's why she called her debut album 'Amstel Delight'. Yet it is part coincidence that she took root in the fertile Dutch musical soil. She arrived here as an expat together with her husband, who was posted to Amsterdam. So we can only wait and see how much longer we'll be able to enjoy Atzko live at the Bimhuis. That's why it was a good choice that she recorded her music. An even better choice was that she engaged bassist Frans van der Hoeven, who is well known in jazz circles and selected a superb recording studio. The mastering of 'Amstel Moments' is also agreeably warm. This has worked wonders for the meandering, resolute play of Atzko in the style of Keith Jarrett and Bill Evans, and for the rounded out sound of Frans' bass. You won't hear the bustle of the city with Kohashi, as her own compositions and interpretations of less well known American repertoire exude a delightful serenity. Atzko plays with a mellowed maturity and a deep passion for piano jazz, possibly betraying a profound connection to Zen Buddhism.  (Jazzflits.nl- 9 Nov 2009)

 

 "Natural, Warm, Human; The melody of life abroad from Atzko Kohashi"   (The Holland Times September 2009)        

                        

"Atzko Kohashi releases her new CD in a fantastic style we know from Bill Evans and Keith Jarrett. This is a definite 'must hear', an album that will grow on you. A wonderful interplay between the piano, played by Atzko, and the bassist Frans van der Hoeven." (Concerto, Platomania/Amsterdam, 2009)   

 

" Including their repertoire on the CD “Amstel Moments,” the duo by Atzko Kohashi and Frans van der Hoeven sounds open-minded and heart-to-heart, being neither stylish nor superficial. It's pleasant but still very thoughtful. “  (Music Magazine/Japan, May 2009)

 

”The duo played by Atzko Kohashi and Frans van der Hoeven has an aesthetic restraint, being neither too much nor too little, which seems something common with Zen philosophy.”   (Swing Journal/Japan, May 2009)

 

"Amazing interpretation on "Don't Explain" within just 4 minute 23 second!! It's very thoughtful and artistic, giving us a feeling of dialogue beneath it."
(M.Goto/ Jazz critic, June 2009)
 

   

Press (NL)


"Jazz-pianiste Atzko Kohashi heeft al eerder cd's uitgebracht met duetten met uitmuntende geluidskwaliteit, nu is er Lujon een cd met het klassieke piano trio. De schitterende opnames (One to One FDR mastering) vonden plaats in Hilversum en zijn uitgebracht door een Japanse platenmaatschappij (Cloud). Muzikaal is het een avontuurlijke reis in de jazz traditie met bass, drums en piano waar het oosten en het westen samenkomen. Lujon staat vol met mooie uitvoeringen van standards (o.a. Quiet van Danny Zeitlin, Gentle Piece van Kenny Wheeler) en improvisaties van de drie hoofdrolspelers. Luistertrip!"          (Concerto Platomania, 2015)                                                                                      

 

“Al eerder gaf pianiste Atzko Kohashi in haar muziek ervan blijk een enorme bewonderaar te zijn van Bill Evans. Als mens en als musicus. De Japanse, in Amsterdam woonachtig, voegt daar met ‘Waltz for Debby’ een hoofdstuk aan toe. Het is bovendien het tweede duo-album dat ze opnam met de Nederlandse contrabassist Frans van der Hoeven. Nu is het niet zo dat ‘Waltz for Debby’ een blauwdruk is van de muziek van de legendarische pianist; het titelstuk is de enige compositie van Evans op het album. Overige stukken zijn afkomstig van onder andere Carla Bley, Duke Ellington, Milton Nascimento, Antonio Carlos Jobim en Steve Swallow. Drie stukken zijn van de hand van Kohashi en Van der Hoeven, waaronder het slotstuk ‘Searching for Debby’. Een alles omvattende titel, want de benaderingswijze van de gespeelde stukken schurkt eng dicht tegen de wijze waarop Evans zijn muziek placht aan te pakken. Verre van clichématig overigens, eerder briljant. Kohashi’s en Van der Hoevens album ‘Waltz for Debby’ blinkt uit in bedachtzaamheid. Een voortdurende samenspraak van piano en contrabas waarin diepgang, dynamiek en het creëren van ruimte schuilgaan. Dusdanig, dat er steeds weer prachtige spanningsbogen ontstaan. Atzko Kohashi varieert van dromerig, indachtig spel tot klankpatronen die plots de ziel raken. Alsof een alledaags verhaal onverwacht van een inhoudelijke importantie wordt voorzien, om het vervolgens weer los te laten. Zowel Kohashi als Van der Hoeven kunnen leunen op hun uitmuntende techniek. Die smelt samen in de zorgvuldige opbouw van de stukken. In verschillende lagen pronken de melodielijnen van het duo. Fijnzinnig, trefzeker, en een voortdurende roep om een vervolg.‘Waltz for Debby’ is een prachtig album dat evenzo goed van de meester zelf had kunnen komen. Dat is allesbehalve een verwijt, maar een onderstreping van de begaafdheden van Atzko Kohashi en Frans van der Hoeven. Met het repertoire van dit album toerden ze al kort door Japan, hopelijk binnenkort door Nederland. “                                                         (Erno Elsinga/Jazzenzo, 2013)

 

De eenmaligheid van elke (muzikale) uiting vangt de Japanner onder de term Ichigo-Ichie. Letterlijk: één moment, één ontmoeting. Geweldig. Een taal met een woordcombinatie voor het aanduiden van de vluchtigheid des levens. In de ‘liner notes’ van haar laatste cd ‘Waltz For Debby’ legt de in Amsterdam wonende Japanse pianiste Atzko Kohashi haarfijn uit hoe zij de zenboedistische wijsheid van Ichigo-Ichie vertaalt naar jazz. Ze speelt met grote intensiteit en het lukt haar voortreffelijk de ‘flow’ van het ogenblik te vangen. Net als voor haar album ‘Amstel Moments’ (2009) stapte Kohashi de studio in met bassist Frans van der Hoeven. Geluidstechnicus Frans de Rond nam de veertien stukken van het duo in twee dagen op en slaagde erin de unieke samensmelting van ingetogen pianospel en dito baspartijen warm en ‘dichtbij’ vast te leggen. Atzko Kohashi wijkt niet van haar eerder gebaande pad: ze is wars van uitsloverij en kiest voor zachte, ronde, behaaglijke noten. Ook Van der Hoeven improviseert achteroverleunend. Het repertoire van ‘Waltz for Debby’ (naar de compositie van Bill Evans, die uiteraard niet ontbreekt op dit schijfje) varieert van eigen werk tot welbekende klassiekers als ‘In my solitude’ van Ellington. De pianiste deinst niet terug voor een vleugje Bach en reist net zo makkelijk naar Zuid-Amerika om Jobim te eren met Estrada Branca. Het alles met een weldadige ontspannenheid en indrukwekkende precisie in het afgewogen spel.                                                                     (Hans Invernizzi /JazzFlitz, 2013)

 

De in Amsterdam wonende Japanse pianiste Atzko Kohashi heeft iets met duo’s. In 2009 nam ze met bassist Frans van der Hoeven ‘Amstel Moments’ op. Een beluisterenswaardige cd waar ze een tournee (in 2013) door haar vaderland aan overhield. Ook in 2009 verscheen het album ‘Turnaround’, een liveregistratie van een concert met de Japanse bassist Yosuke Inoue. Nu is er de cd ‘Dualtone’. Daarvoor dook Kohashi de studio in met drummer Sebastiaan Kaptein, een ervaren musicus die met alle grote namen in ons land heeft samengewerkt en in Okinawa in Japan woont. Het tweetal nam met opnametechnicus Frans de Rond in Hilversum in één dag negen (minder bekende) standards onder handen en drie eigen composities, waaronder ‘Icebreaker No 1’ van Kaptein en ‘Icebreaker No 2’ van Atzko. Het nieuwe album bevat, net als de vorige van Kohashi, geen pianonoot te veel. Wel mag Kaptein de serene oosterse rust plezierig verstoren met veellagig slagwerk. Ook Kohashi laat zich verleiden tot extravertere improvisaties dan we van haar gewend zijn. Maar in de meeste stukken horen we de gedecideerde aanpak die we kennen. De pianiste laat de vleugel weldadig ontspannen zijn werk doen en zoekt het niet in het etaleren van haar gerijpte techniek. Dit is ‘musicians music’ en daarmee geen ijsbreker naar een heel groot publiek. Maar aangezien het in Japan wemelt van oprechte jazzliefhebbers, zullen de concerten daar ongetwijfeld goed worden bezocht. Hopelijk bereiken Kohashi en Kaptein dezelfde ‘flow’ als op de plaat, die dankzij De Rond zeer ‘nabij’ en ‘live’ klinkt.               (Hans Invernizzi /JazzFlits, 2013)

 

Jazzstandards zijn volgens de in Amsterdam wonende en werkende pianiste Atzko Kohashi niet ouderwets. Ze vergelijkt de tunes van de grote meesters van weleer met de recepten van je oma. Je kent ze maar al te goed en kunt ze juist daarom zo waarderen, aldus Kohashi, die uit liefde voor de klassiekers in Tokyo een live-cd opnam met als titel ‘Turnaround – Tokyo Live’.
Het is geen toeval dat de getalenteerde autodidact Kohashi haar album opent met Ornette Colemans song. Met alleen muzikale ondersteuning van Yosuke Inoue op contrabas ontvouwt de pianiste haar liefde voor de jazz verder in onder meer ‘Cry Me a River’ van Arthur Hamilton en ‘Body & Soul’ van John Green en in eigen stukken als ‘Amstel Delight’, haar ode aan onze hoofdstad. Het duo houdt het zeer beschaafd. Kohashi’s behandelt de melodieën met eerbied. Van pianistische uitspattingen is geen sprake. Ook de bassist haalt geen stunts uit. Het resultaat is een zeer ontspannen plaat waarop Atzko Kohashi lekker swingt in de up tempo-stukken en lyrisch achterover leunt in de ballads. De Japanse heeft een zijdezacht toucher maar speelt niet week.
Ze weet een fraaie balans te vinden tussen de westerse nervositeit, die ze leerde kennen in New York en die je in veel jazz terughoort, en de oosterse zelfbeheersing die ze meenam uit haar vaderland. Heel erg ‘live’ klinkt ‘Turnaround’ niet. Het publiek horen we alleen tussen de nummers door zachtjes applaudisseren. Maar de ‘feel’ is desondanks uitstekend.
(Hans Invernizzi / Jazzflits.nl- 21 Maart, 2011)

 

"De Japanse pianiste Atzko Kohashi woont sinds 2005 in Amsterdam. Tot enorme tevredenheid, zoals zij in het cd-boekje van deze plaat uitlegt. Amsterdam inspireert haar, ze ontmoette er prachtige mensen en ze roemt de rijke jazzhistorie van de stad, die mede wordt gevormd door bezoek of verblijf van groten uit de geschiedenis van de jazz. De titel ‘Amstel Moments’ van deze cd is er dan ook een met grote betekenis voor de jazzpianiste.
‘Amstel Moments’ is voor zowel Atzko Kohashi als Frans van der Hoeven het eerste duo-album in hun carrière. Ze zetten er meteen een vette punt mee. Want het album is een machtige proeve van hun kunnen, die wordt gevormd door verregaand vakmanschap en een fijnzinnig gevoel voor elkaars emoties. Alle twaalf stukken van de plaat verlopen in een rustig, meditatief tempo. De muziek wordt nergens voorzien van accenten, van op-de-borst-klopperij of overdreven vertoon van techniek. De pianist en contrabassist hebben dat immers  niet nodig: hun wijze van musiceren vertelt alles over zowel hun opvattingen als hun persoonlijkheid.
Binnen de bijna serene rust die zij creëren, zien zij kans eigen opvattingen aan de wetten van de jazz toe te voegen. In de standard ‘Don’t Explain’ bijvoorbeeld is het tempo zo laag dat je steeds denkt: wanneer tuimelen piano en contrabas om? Niets ervan: die traagheid geeft het nummer een opwindend cachet.
Indrukwekkend is de wijze waarop de twee met elkaar communiceren. Dat gebeurt zonder uitzondering in overleg: niemand neemt het voortouw, niemand breekt uit. Het is een voortdurend aanreiken en accepteren, uitwerken en toevoegen van eigen emoties en inzichten. ‘Amstel Moments’ is daarmee een exceptionele plaat, een mooie toevoeging aan de geschiedenis van jazzstad Amsterdam.       (Rinus van der Heijden /Jazzenzo.nl- 17 November 2009)

 

"De Japanse jazzpianiste Atzko Kohashi – autodidact, maar geschoold door Steve Kuhn - is idolaat van Amsterdam. Hoewel ze successen boekte in haar moederland en zeven jaar in het Mekka van de jazz New York woonde en werkte, roemt zij in interviews en de linernotes van haar tweede cd ‘Amstel Moments’ het muzikale klimaat van onze hoofdstad. Ze geniet van de vrijheid
en tolerantie, de openheid en nuchtere mentaliteit in Mokum. Niet voor niets gaf Atzko haar eerste album de titel ‘Amstel Delight’. Toch is het puur toeval dat Kohashi de vruchtbare Nederlandse
voedingsbodem ontdekte. Zij belandde hier als expat omdat haar echtgenoot door zijn werkgever naar ons land werd overgeplaatst. Dus het is afwachten geblazen hoelang we kunnen genieten van Atzko live in het Bimhuis. Het is een goede zaak dat ze haar muziek heeft laten registreren.
Een nog betere keuze is het inzetten van contrabassist Frans van der Hoeven, die iedereen in het jazzwereldje kent en een voortreffelijke geluidsstudio uitzocht. ‘Amstel Moments’ is heerlijk warm gemasterd. Dat komt het meanderende, gedecideerde spel van Atzko in de stijl van Bill Evans en Keith Jarrett en de ronde sound van Frans’ bas zeer ten goede. De drukte van de stad hoor je bij Kohashi niet terug. De eigen songs en interpretaties van minder bekend Amerikaans werk stralen een weldadige rust uit. Atzko speelt met een gerijpte volwassenheid en diep doorvoelde liefde voor pianojazz, die een verknochtheid aan het Zenboeddhisme doet vermoeden.      
(Hans Invernizzi / Jazzflits.nl- 9 Nov 2009)

 

 

レビュー

異国に暮らす小橋敦子のピアノから聞こえる旋律は、自然で、温かく、人間らしい」(The Holland Time, The Netherlands)


「必聴のアルバムだ。聞くたびごとにより好きになってくるだろう。小橋敦子のピアノとフランス・ヴァン・デル・フーヴェンのベースの素晴らしいインタープレイに驚かされる」 (Concerto, Platomania/Amsterdam)


「日本的な香りのする、弾きすぎないが決して過不足のない小橋のピアノと、充分にベースを鳴らしながら決して小橋の世界を邪魔せず、奥ゆかしいフランス・ヴァン・デル・フーヴェンのデュオ。異なる感性を有した二人だからこそ逆に、このような知的で情感溢れる演奏が可能になったのだろう」    (馬場啓一/スイングジャーナル2009)


「選曲も含め、実にしっとりとしたムードに終始するも、虚心坦懐というか、雰囲気だけの感じが全くなくて良い」                             (松尾史朗/ミュージック・マガジン)


「Don't Explain でのわずか4 分23 秒の演奏の中に二人の歌と対話がある。高い芸術性をもった、鳥肌が立つような素晴らしいデュオだ」    (後藤誠/ Rifftide)

 

 デュオ・アルバム「アムステル・モーメンツ」は小橋敦子とフランス・ヴァン・デル・フーヴェンの繊細な感性と豊かな技量が一体となった素晴らしい作品だ。全12 曲はゆったりとした瞑想的なテンポで繰り広げられるが、決して不必要に飾り立てることも、超絶技巧を披露することもしない。なぜなら、このピアニストとベーシストにはその必要がない――二人の演奏からそれぞれの個性と音楽への発想が自然に聞こえてくる。さらに、デュオの創り上げる静謐な空間の中にも彼ら独特のジャズ観が感じられる。そのよい例がスタンダード曲のDon’t Explain だ。どちらかが躓くのではと思うほどゆっくりとしたテンポの演奏だが、そんな心配どころかむしろこのスリル感が曲の哀しさをいっそう際立てている。二人のコミュニケーションのとり方も感動的だ。どちらがリードすることも、どちらかが突出することもなく、対話には常に調和がある。互いの感情、思考を込めて練りあげられた途絶えることのない音楽的交感がそこにある。それが、「アムステル・モーメンツ」を一際優れたレコーディングにし、ジャズの街アムステルダムにとって新たな喜びを加えてくれることになった。   (Rinus van der Heijden/Jazzenzo, The Netherlands) 

                                                                  「アムステル・モーメンツ」のサウンドは温かく心地よい。キース・ジャレット、ビル・エバンスのスタイルに通じる小橋敦子のくねり流れながらも毅然としたプレイと、フランス・ヴァン・デル・フーヴェンのベースの丸みのある音色が驚くほどの効果を発揮している。彼らの演奏から街の喧騒は聞こえず、小橋のオリジナル作品と知られてい
ないアメリカのジャズの名曲が、心地のよい穏やかな雰囲気をかもし出す。小橋の演奏は円熟した味わいで、ジャズピアノへの深い愛情が伺われる。もしかすると、「禅」への繋がりを暗示しているのかもしれない。 (Hans Invernizzi/Jazzflits, The Netherlands)


Interview @ Jazz Tokyo 小橋敦子インタビュー記事事http://www.jazztokyo.com/interview/interview135.html

 

小橋敦子+Frans van der Hoeven コンサートレビュー  http://www.jazztokyo.com/live_report/report552.html

 

Jazz Tokyo Five by Five #756 『小橋敦子+井上陽介/ターナラウンド -Tokyo Live-』
text by 稲岡邦弥    Five by Five Review #756